New Year's Cleaning

This year make a New Year’s Resolution you can keep. With a Meal-to-Meal Grill Maintenance plan you can extend the day-to-day performance and ultimately, the life of your charcoal and gas grills.
 
Our Meal-to-Meal Grill Maintenance plan consists of the following three simple, yet important cleaning steps:

  1. Keep the grease collection tray clean for gas grills and remove ashes each time you grill for charcoal.
  2. Preheat your grill to 500° to 600° F for at least 15 minutes each time you grill. This will burn off the residue of the previous meal.
  3. Brush the cooking grates with a stiff wire Weber stainless steel grill brush before cooking.

Check out this latest video blog to see how to keep your grills in tip-top shape.

What are your thoughts? (11)

01.04.14

Albert H

I just received a Weber Q for my birthday. I've been a kettle user for decades and enjoyed countless tasty BBQs. I have a favorite sugar based marinade for chicken which is great but when cooking is finished the caramelized sugar sticks stubbornly to every crevice of the grill. I spend over an hour scraping off every charred bit.

My question is this- does anyone out there know of a product which might save me a couple of hours scraping?

Happy to share my recipe if you'd like it.
Albert

01.04.14

Kevin Kolman

Hi Albert,

First of all, Happy Birthday. What an excellent gift you have there with the Weber Q! You bring up an interesting question. In my experience, I have not found a product that will save you time, but I have found a technique that will help you out. First, preheat your grill each time before you use it. Allow it to come up to temperature for about 15-20 minutes before you put your food on. When using marinades, especially ones that are high in sugar, I adjust the heat to a lower setting. I still sear first, but then I turn the grill down. This will help with the overcooking of the marinade which is what leaves char on your grates. Keep in mind that while doing this, the food may take a little longer to finish cooking, but it will still taste great and you will have less mess. Keep me posted on the recipe.

Happy Grilling!
-Kevin

04.26.12

Chris L

Sounds great, Kevin! I look forward to seeing it, especially after the pollen gunking we've gotten over the past few weeks! :o)

04.09.12

Chris L

Hi Kevin,
It looks like my previous comment got truncated. Anyway, I was wondering if you'd be able to post a spring cleaning video tutorial for those of us who just did the quick grate cleaning over the winter, but are in need of a thorough cleaning now that the weather's nice. Everything from how you should scrape down the firebox and drip trays, brush the burners and flavorizers, and return the stainless steel and enamel coating to a like-new shine. Thanks!

04.09.12

Kevin Kolman

Hi StoopidMonkey81:
We are actually just got done filming a great video on cleaning and maintaining a gas grill. We covered all the topics above and a couple more. It should be up very soon so make sure you check back. I know you will enjoy it. Thanks for the great post and Happy Grilling!!-Kevin

03.23.12

Victor C

Kevin,

I am a charcoal grill guy and have been for many years. I read your preheating suggestion and will take it to heart. I hadn't done so because I thought the meat/chicken, etc would stick to the grill, if preheated. My question: I don't seem able to do chicken parts (with a teriyaki/soy sauce baste) without charring the skin and drying the chicken out and that never makes my wife happy. I grill it for 45 minutes, indirect method, mid-to-large charcoal pile (how do you figure small to large piles-number of briquetts?). I still use an electric starter. Your chicken recipies seem done for a much shorter time period (8-12 minutes). Am I doing it too long and is the fire too hot? Thanks Vic

03.23.12

Kevin Kolman

Hi Vic:
I appreciate your feedback and honesty. If people could follow the pre-heating routine regularly the food they are grilling would be 100 times better. It is a very simple concept but like most skills, it all boils down to execution.

Let's talk grilling first, then we will talk about using marinades and sauces. If you are grilling chicken pieces (bone-in) the breast (10-12 ounces) should take you 25-35 minutes. This should be 3-5 minutes over a direct heat for the sear and 20-30 minutes over an indirect heat. The charcoal should be in two separate piles opposite each other. You should have a large indirect area directly in the middle of your grill.

If you are doing chicken pieces (legs and thighs, bone-in) those will take 35-40 minutes to grill. They should grill 5-10 minutes over a medium direct heat then moved over to indirect for 30 minutes. If you are grilling on a 22.5 inch kettle you will start with either a chimney starter with 50 briquettes in it or two piles with 25 briquettes in each. This will give you a medium direct area and a medium indirect area. Now if you are doing boneless and skinless pieces of chicken those should take 8-12 minutes. Always grilled over a medium direct heat.

Additionally, it appears that your fire is too hot so you need to use less charcoal and also adjust the dampers to make sure you are keeping a nice roasting temperature inside your grill. One thing you need to realize is that when using marinades that are high in sugar those can over caramelize. What I like doing when I grill chicken is use some olive oil, salt, pepper and garlic as my rub. I will grill it and the last 5-10 minutes I will baste the chicken with teriyaki, soy sauce or a bbq sauce. You get the outstanding results without overcaramelizing. If you want to use it as a marinade this is not a problem either. You just have to make sure you are keeping the heat at a 350-425 degree temperature. If the temperature inside your grill is too hot you will overcarmelize your food causing it to over char.

I am hoping by reading this Vic we can get you back on the right track. Follow the tips and you should be ok. Hope this helps and Happy Grilling!!-Kevin

02.27.12

Michelle S

Over the years my cast iron grill grates have rusted in some spots. Can I use it this way (I hope not as it just seems yucky)? Do I need to buy new ones? Advice is appreciated!

02.27.12

Kevin Kolman

Hi Grilling15235:
Another great question. If your grates are showing some surface oxidation or rust in some spots it might be time to get yourself some new grates. If the grates are a couple years old you might want to see if they are covered under the warranty of the grill by calling our customer service at 800-446-1071. Just make sure you have the serial number. If you have had the grill for longer and the warranty has expired, the simple fix is to replace the grates completely. Hope this helps and Happy Grilling!!-Kevin

02.10.12

Karen D

Hi Kevin - I'm loving my new Genesis 330 Special Edition Grill. Just wondering if there is a particular Weber grill brush I should use for cleaning the grates since my grates are stainless? My last Weber lasted almost 17 years but had porcelain grates and I know stainless scratches easily so I just want to be sure before purchasing a brush. Thanks much.

02.10.12

Kevin Kolman

Hi Badbea:
I am very happy to hear that you are enjoying your new Genesis EP-330. What a grill!! The best advice I can give you for cleaning and maintaining your stainless steel cooking grates are as follows.. One, always preheat your grill for 10-15 minutes to bring the grill up to temperature. During this time the grill will burn off most of the food particles left on from prior grilling. A properly preheated grill will also help keep food from sticking to the grates. Second, I recommend using a Weber stainless steel bristle grill brush for cleaning. This should be done right after the grill is preheated. Don’t worry about scratching the grates. Through our testing we have found that our brush will not harm your any of our cooking grates. Hope this helps and Happy Grilling!!-Kevin

01.27.12

Todd G

Kevin,

I have been told to burn off after cooking. The weber rep told me this was important in order to turn water, grease, left over food, etc. to a white powder. This reduces rust from developing.

Thanks.

01.27.12

Kevin Kolman

Hi Toddrus:
You bring up an interesting point here. Weber recommends pre-heating the grill for 10-15 minutes before grilling. During this time the grill will turn most of the water,grease and left over food into white powder. Anything else left on the grates should be removed with a Weber stainless steel brush. Doing a burn off is a little redundant. Either way lets make sure we always keep the grates our BBQ clean as much as possible. Hope this helps and Happy Grilling. -Kevin

01.15.12

FLAVIO F

Hi Kevin..
The Burners do not burn evenly like before.
Please tell me what to do..??
Thank you

01.15.12

Kevin Kolman

Hi ELPASTELERO1960: There are a couple of things you can do yourself to try and remedy the situation. One problem that could be occurring is the tubes are clogged with debris. This could be part of the reason your grill is under performing. To clean your tubes start by taking out the grates and Flavorizer bars while the grill is cool. Then use a Weber stainless steel grilling brush and clean the port holes of your burner tubes. You should start on the far right side closest to the control knobs proceeding to the left. Now most important you want to clean the tubes in an up and down motion. Second, give the grill a complete cleaning. Third, refer to the cleaning directions in your owner’s manual. Here’s a link to download the manuals online: http://help.weber.com/manuals.aspx. Please call our customer service line at 800-446-1071 if you continue to have performance issues after completing the aforementioned steps. Make sure you have the serial number of the unit and our very knowledgeable agents will be glad to help you out. Hope this helps and Happy Grilling!! -Kevin

01.04.12

Jared F

You forgot the BIG drip pan on the gas grill! That gets full of burnt on crud and grease and gunk, like nobody's business! You don't HAVE to throw away the little drip pan, clean it out and reuse it. I've done it twice now. The spare little drip pan underneath it is still clean and unused! Save money where you can and clean where they forgot to tell you to!

I use my stock cast iron grates... holds heat better and chars great! Grease buildup helps keep food from sticking, so don't clean it as often, as you would a stainless steel grate.

01.04.12

Bruce Eric A

Great tips and ones that shouldn't be save until the start of the new year. While I almost always have a disposable Weber drip pan on hand, if I don't I'll simply put a cup or two of sand (pull it from your kids' sandbox if you have to) in the bottom of the tray to capture any grease. When you're done grilling, simply pour it all out in your trash can.